World War Two Photo of Aerial View of the Upper-Level Decks of the Roman Colosseum and Tourists

George Sakata

$24.99
  • City: Rome
  • Country: Italy
  • Source: Sakata
  • Approx. Date: 1940s
  • Photographer: Sakata

Clusters of tourists wander around the walls of the ancient Colosseum and marvel at the historic man-made structure. The angle of the photograph gives us a better perspective of just how remarkable the Colosseum is and the different levels that it operated on. From the upper level of the amphitheater, visitors are able to gaze below and see the inner workings of the hypogeum, a once-underground system of tunnels and cubicles that housed the animals used in demonstrations, as well as the dead bodies of gladiators who lost their lives during performances.  Unfortunately, a large amount of damage has occurred on the upper levels, but its uneven, rough shape adds to the timeless appeal of the Colosseum.

Built during the Flavian Dynasty in AD72, the Colosseum used to hold around 80,000 people who watched different performances such as executions, gladiatorial competitions, and reenactments of classical mythology. These performances used to be the prime form of entertainment for the Romans. Later on, as Catholicism emerged, Colosseum began to be used for different purposes a location for workshops, housing for the religious order, and a sanctuary. The combination of natural disasters and robbers caused the majority of the amphitheater's destruction, but its natural appeal still lingers into the present day.

 Taken by George Sakata, a photographer featured throughout our website. George was a member of the infamous 100th Division 442nd Nisei Regimental Combat Team in WWII. This was the only Japanese American unit in WWII and was nicknamed the "Go For Broke" unit. The 442nd had a casualty rate of 93% and was awarded 21 Medal of Honors. Click here for more information on the 442nd RCB unit.

Regular price $24.99
  • City: Rome
  • Country: Italy
  • Source: Sakata
  • Approx. Date: 1940s
  • Photographer: Sakata

Clusters of tourists wander around the walls of the ancient Colosseum and marvel at the historic man-made structure. The angle of the photograph gives us a better perspective of just how remarkable the Colosseum is and the different levels that it operated on. From the upper level of the amphitheater, visitors are able to gaze below and see the inner workings of the hypogeum, a once-underground system of tunnels and cubicles that housed the animals used in demonstrations, as well as the dead bodies of gladiators who lost their lives during performances.  Unfortunately, a large amount of damage has occurred on the upper levels, but its uneven, rough shape adds to the timeless appeal of the Colosseum.

Built during the Flavian Dynasty in AD72, the Colosseum used to hold around 80,000 people who watched different performances such as executions, gladiatorial competitions, and reenactments of classical mythology. These performances used to be the prime form of entertainment for the Romans. Later on, as Catholicism emerged, Colosseum began to be used for different purposes a location for workshops, housing for the religious order, and a sanctuary. The combination of natural disasters and robbers caused the majority of the amphitheater's destruction, but its natural appeal still lingers into the present day.

 Taken by George Sakata, a photographer featured throughout our website. George was a member of the infamous 100th Division 442nd Nisei Regimental Combat Team in WWII. This was the only Japanese American unit in WWII and was nicknamed the "Go For Broke" unit. The 442nd had a casualty rate of 93% and was awarded 21 Medal of Honors. Click here for more information on the 442nd RCB unit.